Thursday, May 28, 2015

Wednesday, April 29, 2015

Eustress versus Distress

Mayo Clinic Health System Health Note:

Did you know that there is good stress and bad stress?
Eustress is positive stress on your body that gives you the motivation and focus you need to begin your day. It may bring feelings of excitement and improve performance at work or at home. Distress is known as the "bad stress" that is associated with the negative outcomes. Characteristics of distress include anxiety, short- or long-term effects, decreased performance, and mental or physical problems.

What are some life events that cause us good or bad stress? Examples of “good stress,” or eustress, include holiday get-togethers, moving to a new home, planning a wedding, taking on a new career, having a child, taking a vacation, enrolling in a class, or retiring. “Bad stress” or distress comes from life events including job demands, death of a loved one, divorce, hospitalization, financial concerns, unemployment, abuse/neglect, sleep concerns, and interpersonal conflicts.

There are a variety of stressors beyond the examples listed, but these are some of the most common that people face. Stand up to your stressors by being assertive, managing a detailed schedule and following it, and planning ahead to avoid procrastination. Remember: you are you life's driver; stay aware and drive safe. 

From:
Amy Every
Senior Communication Consultant
Marketing Communications
Mayo Clinic Health System Franciscan Healthcare
700 West Avenue South
La Crosse, WI 54601
mayoclinichealthsystem.org

Tuesday, April 28, 2015

Advantages of Farmer's Markets

Mayo Clinic Health System Health Note:

Farmer’s markets have been advertised as a healthier option to eat fresher, more varied foods during the growing season, but the benefits of buying from a local farmer don’t stop with your health. Buying local at a farmer’s market can be a great way to make a positive choice for the environment while at the same time strengthening your community.

According to the United States Department of Agriculture, the number of farmers markets in the U.S. has doubled in the last five years increasing from 4,685 in 2008 t0 8,144 in 2013. Farmer’s markets are full of colorful food like fruits and vegetables, and often include many handmade or homegrown items like flowers, crafts, and jewelry. By investing in farmer’s markets, you put your dollar directly back into people in your local community.

The majority of produce in the United States today was picked on average one week before being put on display in supermarkets, and usually traveled many miles to get there. The benefits of eating from a farmer’s market is that the foods have probably traveled less distance, and haven’t lost as many nutrients due to the length of time between picking and selling. In addition to being fresher and having more nutrients, farmer’s markets allow you to mix up your diet by trying many different foods you might not regularly be exposed to.

By checking out a local farmer’s market you can make a great choice for your health, the environment, and the local community.

From:
Amy Every
Senior Communication Consultant
Marketing Communications
Mayo Clinic Health System Franciscan Healthcare
700 West Avenue South
La Crosse, WI 54601
mayoclinichealthsystem.org 

Monday, November 24, 2014

Tips on how to snack in a healthy way

Mayo Clinic Health System Health Note:

(this message fits into the PdC Public School staff challenge of MAINTAIN, NO GAIN over the Holidays season)

We all need a snack here and there during the day, but there is definitely a right way and a wrong way to snack.

Several warnings surround snacking if you are trying to maintain a healthy weight and lifestyle, but if you’re picking the right snack, it can actually be beneficial and stop you from munching more at later meals. By snacking, you can satisfy your hunger and stop yourself from consuming hundreds of extra calories a day by not overeating at the next meal. Advice from health professionals about snacking can include not keeping junk food in the house, and watching out for nutrition labels, especially on foods advertised as “low-fat” or “fat-free.”

In addition to this snacking wisdom, lots of healthy snack habits exist to help fight off hunger and control weight.

1. Don’t snack where you slack: Designate certain snacking zones like the kitchen, and avoid eating in front of the TV. Pairing snacking with watching TV can create an association that could lead to mindless munching.

2. Power up with grains: Looking for some energy from your snack? Look to whole grains like whole-grain pretzels or cereals that will provide a lasting boost.

3. Snacks can be sweet: If you find yourself not being able to deny your sweet tooth, mix in low-fat puddings, frozen yogurt, or frozen fruit bars as an alternative to other, more sugary treats.

4. Go nuts!: Nuts like almonds, pecans, walnuts, and macadamia nuts can be filling snacks that may also improve your heart health by lowering cholesterol.

Information from:
Amy Every
Senior Communication Consultant, Marketing Communications
Mayo Clinic Health System Franciscan Healthcare
mayoclinichealthsystem.org

Thursday, November 13, 2014

Tips to help students to stay healthy in cold/flu season

This Mayo Clinic Health Note is something school staff and parents are all too familiar with - students getting sick from all the germs getting spread around. Here are some tips that can help your student stay healthy.

Does it seem like school age children are always coming down with something? When children are at school they are exposed to a lot of different germs and bacteria, putting their immune systems to the test. In addition to getting a goodnight’s sleep, eating a healthy diet and getting regular exercise, those at school can take other precautions to stay healthy.

1. Hand-Washing. Frequent hand-washing can help prevent spreading disease. Hand-washing should occur before eating, after going to the bathroom and blowing one’s nose, and also playing outside.

2. Hand Sanitizer. Using hand sanitizer before eating and after sharing communicable objects like pencils sharpeners or a computer mouse can help kill the bacteria that can linger on these community objects.

3. Cover Up. If sick, try to avoid coughing or sneezing into the open air by using a tissue, or if a tissue is unavailable, cough or sneeze into the crook of the elbow.

4. Hands Off. Bacteria can enter through the open areas of the body like the eyes or mouth. Keeping hands out of these areas can prevent the spread of disease by not allowing these bacteria into the body. Not sharing personal items like water bottles or food can also stop the spread of bacteria this way.

5. Stay Vaccinated. Staying up to date on vaccinations, especially the yearly flu vaccine can help kids be healthy and stay in school.

From:
Amy Every
Senior Communication Consultant, Marketing Communications
Mayo Clinic Health System Franciscan Healthcare
mayoclinichealthsystem.org

Tuesday, September 2, 2014

Tips on how your family can get more rest

Mayo Clinic Health System Health Note:

As the kids get back to school, we hear a lot about how important it is for them to get a good night's sleep. The same is true for adults. Getting the right amount of sleep can be essential to staying healthy by letting your body have enough time to restore and heal during nighttime hours. The amount of sleep everyone needs varies depending on age, but a good rule of thumb is 9-11 hours for school-age children, and 7-8 hours for adults. Often the many factors in our busy lives can interfere with the required amount of sleep needed each night, but you can take steps to try to help yourself or your child get the right amount of shuteye.
  1. Stick to a sleep schedule: Go to bed and wake up at the same time each day, even on weekends or holidays, to help create a consistent sleep pattern. However, if you don’t fall asleep within 15 minutes, get up and do something else to avoid agonizing over falling asleep.
  2. Watch what you eat and drink: Being hungry or too full when going to bed can cause too much discomfort to fall asleep.
  3. Have a bedtime ritual: Create a ritual in which you do the same things before bed every day to help tell your body it’s time to wind down.
  4. Be comfortable: Work on a sleep environment that is comfortable to you, this often means cool, quiet, dark, and bedding that suits you.
  5. Limit daytime naps: Napping during the day can interfere with sleep at night. If you do nap, try to take the nap in the midafternoon and limit it to 10-30 minutes.
  6. Exercise: Including daily exercise can help you fall asleep faster, and sleep deeper. Exercising too close to bed however can interfere with sleep by increasing energy.
  7. Manage Stress: Working on managing the daily stressors in life can help calm your mind and provide peaceful sleep. Before bed, try jotting down what is stressing you out and set it aside to be dealt with tomorrow.
From: Amy A. Every; Mayo Clinic Health System

Sunday, May 18, 2014

Are dietary supplements needed?

Mayo Clinic Health System Health Note on Supplements vs. Whole Foods:

It is important to meet your nutritional needs mainly through your diet, but what if you struggle to get the nutrition you feel you need? Is it ok to take a supplement instead? Some supplements may be a useful way to get the nutrients you may be lacking, but they cannot measure up to the benefits and nutrients of whole foods. 

Therefore, before you start ingesting supplements, it is very important to know and understand what they will and will not do. If you are usually healthy and eat a wide variety of foods each day, you probably do not need to take a supplement. On the other hand, if you do not consume enough calories each day, are a vegan or vegetarian and do not eat a wide variety of foods, are a woman and have heavy bleeding during your menstrual cycle, or have a medical condition in which your body does not properly absorb nutrients, you could consider talking to your doctor about what supplement would be best for you.

From:
Amy Every
Senior Communication Consultant, Marketing Communications
Mayo Clinic Health System Franciscan Healthcare
mayoclinichealthsystem.org